Armenian Folk-tales and Fables

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Authors
Downing, Charles
Issue Date
1993
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Book, Whole
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Abstract
The introduction shows a surprising sensitivity to fable as a distinct genre. The book presents thirty-five fables (193-205), a large proportion of them the work of either Vardan of Aygek or Mekhithar Gosh. At least seven are straight Aesopic fables, including those ascribed to Olompianos, probably just another name for Aesop. Two fables improve on Aesop: In Fair Shares (198), there are three victims of the hunting group. After the lion hits the wolf so hard that an eye pops out, the fox apportions one of the spoils for each of the lion's three daily meals. In The Fox and the Partridge (202), the captured partridge recommends thanking God for the good catch. My recommended sampler of fables from this book includes Priests and Princes, The Bargain, The Wolf's ABC, The Peacock and the Eagle, and The Price of Dignity. None of the fables is illustrated.
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Oxford University Press
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