Write with Lions

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Authors
Aesop
Markus, Jim
Meekhof, Nicole
Issue Date
2013
Type
Book, Whole
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This is a lively book. Markus has imagined the fables' stories afresh. He thus comes up with a line I cannot remember hearing for one of his earliest fables. The miser whose buried gold was stolen hears from the neighbor: When the gold was there, you had it not (25). Even more, Markus directs the fables here specifically to writers. What might have been labeled a moral elsewhere here becomes Aesop's Tip, and it is specific to writers. For example, after the fable about a fox and goat in a well, Aesop's Tip is Look before you leap. Before accepting a writing assignment, make sure to understand the expectations and the audience. Don't be afraid to ask questions (30). For each of the thirty-five fables, there are then several Writing Prompts. For The Fox and the Goat, these include writing a trapped trickster traps foolish helper modern story, writing an alternate fable in which the goat escapes, and rewriting with new characters in a modern city. The illustrations for each of the thirty-five contribute by pointing towards the Tip. The mother monkey, for example, on 56 has an appropriate look of chagrin for this fable and her child an appropriate look of fear as he is cradled protectively by her arms. The book adds eleven additional fables with only writing prompts. Further sections are Writing Games and Exercises and Worksheets. This may be the first print-on-demand book I can recommend to people. I also celebrate because it happens to be the 8000th book catalogued in this collection.
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