6 Fábulas de Iriarte

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Authors
Iriarte, Tomas
Issue Date
1969
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Abstract
Lively colored cartoons present "The Cathedral Bell and the Little Bell"; "The Muff, the Fan, and the Umbrella"; "The Bee and the Cuckoo"; "The Wolf and the Shepherd"; "The Naturalist and the Lizards"; and "The Two Inns." The little bell came to be as highly regarded as the cathedral bell because it was rung only on great occasions. So some people try to make an impression by seldom speaking. The umbrella one-ups both the summer fan and the winter muff by his claim to be helpful against both rain in winter and sun in summer. The bee criticizes the cuckoo for his monotonous song; then the cuckoo criticizes the bee for his monotonous cells. The bee explains that uniformity in works of usefulness is helpful. In works of taste it is a tedious waste. The wolf defends himself: his skin, his claws, his teeth, his fat are used by people productively. The shepherd responds "No thanks to you if, now and then, some good you chance to do." Iriarte of course applies the lesson to contemporary books. One lizard escapes after he sees what the naturalist has done in dissecting his fellow lizard. He goes back and reports to the lizards that they are highly analyzed and highly respected "whatever spiteful folks may say." So, Iriarte says, we give bad writers an overblown idea of themselves if we take their trashy writing seriously. The two inns, like books, belie their covers. My prize in this 16-page pamphlet about 7" x 8" goes to the four illustrations of the lizards.
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Ediciones Toray
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