Der Räuber und die Liebe: Märchen und Fabeln aus Marokko

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Authors
Graffenried, Harry von
Issue Date
1967
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Book, Whole
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I have had to wait six years to catalogue this book! Of the twenty-five stories listed in the final T of C, about the last fourteen are fables. Ein sehr menschlicher Esel (75) presents a clever switch: a thief switches himself for a weary traveler's trailing ass and then proclaims that he was cursed and then uncursed by his mother. Of course the man frees him. His wife demands that he buy another ass, and he is surprised to find his old ass for sale. He approaches him and tells him that he must have offended his mother again and that he will not buy him again. Der Löwe, der Igel und der Schakal (79) follows the form of a popular fable: How did you learn to divide so well? The jackal taught me. Wer den Richter zum Gegner hat… is like La Fontaine's fable of the two men who find an oyster; here it is two children who find a nut. Of course their judge consumes it (91). Der Schakal und der Jäger is right out of Kalila and Dimna. The jackal finds three dead bodies and decides to eat the strung bow first (91-2). That is always a mistake! The Hoffmann illustrations help to make this so valuable--and there are so many of them! Among the fable illustrations, Ein sehr menschlicher Esel (76) may be the most complex and engaging.
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Flamberg Verlag
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