Aesop's Fables with their Morals: in Prose and Verse, Grammatically Translated

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1741
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Book, Whole
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Together with the History of His Life and Death. Newly and Exactly Translated out of the Original Greek. This edition was first published by Francis Eglesfield in London in 1651 (Bodemann #71.1) and then by Philiips Rhodes and Taylor in London in 1715 (Bodemann #71.2). Bodemann calls both this edition and the latter a leicht veränderter Nachdruck. The full-page frontispiece shows Aesop with animals. Bodemann registers 213 fable and 31 vita illustrations, always just before the appropriate text. Metzner, who did the listing, notes the varying quality of the various streams of illustration here. The first elements in the book are an AI of the fables and a chronological T of C of the life. The fables are numbered. The woodcuts are surprisingly rudimentary. Those that rise above this description include FC (17); The Dog Invited to Supper (213); Aesop and Xanthus' Naked Wife (333); and The People of Delphi Cast Aesop from a Cliff (369). Some are attractive in their elementary way, like The Swallow and Other Birds (26); TB (137); The Fox and the Goat (179); and The Mother Ape and Her Two Sons (263). This book represents my most serious purchase during the European trip of 2014. I was happy to find it in Norway, where the offerings were particularly slim. Each fable adds a poem in rhyming couplets to its prose story and moral.. The Rape of the Lock (1751) is bound in at the book's end.
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J. Hodges
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