Harvesting the Law: Personal Reflections on Thirty Years of Change in Agricultural Legislation

No Thumbnail Available
Authors
Hamilton, Neil D.
Issue Date
2013
Type
Journal Article
Language
Keywords
Research Projects
Organizational Units
Journal Issue
Alternative Title
Abstract
INTRODUCTION|Thirty years of teaching and writing about agricultural law have provided me with the opportunity to study the operation of hundreds of laws and legislative proposals relating to food and farming. The laws range from the periodic federal farm bills, encompassing hundreds of discrete topics in one piece of legislation, to more narrowly drawn state statutes or local ordinances, designed to address legal questions unique or specific to an area or type of farming. Over these thirty years, our agricultural sector has gone through a significant evolution in the types of crops raised, the scale of farm size, and the economic structure of farms and agricultural businesses. Perhaps more accurately these thirty years should be viewed as a period of contrasting changes because, unlike the linear direction of evolution, many changes in U.S. agriculture have been divergent. Just as the agricultural sector has changed so too have the nature and the role of law, in particular legislation relating to agriculture. Often legislation is proposed to respond to social forces and emerging needs, such as the FDA Food Safety Modernization Act of 2010, while other acts are responses to fears or concerns held primarily by those in the agriculture community. Regardless of the motivations behind any legislative idea, there is wide variation in the effectiveness and value of the laws we have considered or enacted...
Description
Citation
46 Creighton L. Rev. 563 (2012-2013)
Publisher
Creighton University School of Law
License
Journal
Volume
Issue
PubMed ID
DOI
ISSN
EISSN