Fables for Children

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Authors
Pearl, Irene
Issue Date
1948
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Book, Whole
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There is an identical copy of this book already in the collection, but I am also including this copy because its first two illustrations are nicely hand-colored. This is a good example of a venerable old practice. The fact that only the first two are done may witness to the fact that the drawer found something better to do with her or his evenings! As I wrote of the other copy, these fifeen fables are unusual in filling out traditional fables. The author's note says of her childhood experience of well-known fables The shrewd lessons they had to teach were often above my head, and I wanted to know much more about the Fox, the Cock, the Donkey and the others. Thus, as the flyleaf says, the characters are allowed to linger, to talk of this and that, and show themselves in their true colours in a more leisurely way than they previously had time to do. Several of the stories here (including The Dog, the Cat, and the Thieving Wolf; The Miser; The Travellers; and The Sailor and the Servant) are new fables created by the author. FG turns into a story of a shotgun death in a fox-pit dug beneath the fruit-bearing vine. The donkey ends up not starving but playing the cymbals in the animals' orchestra (20). FK is true to the traditional tale but adds new motivation for the original request for a king (21-22). CP becomes a story of camels and a well (25). The perplexed father is lucky: it rains at night, with sunshine in the morning, and so both of his daughters are happy. There are simple black-and-white designs for each fable.
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Oxford University Press
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