The Wolf and the Horse

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2013
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Book, Whole
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One of twenty in the series, found near the counter as we were settling up a large order of books. As has happened before in this series, I wonder if the version of this story offered here has been thought through. Never underestimate others fits well as a moral but is quite general. A hungry wolf here wants to eat some of a horse's leg but somehow lets himself get distracted by the horse's real wound, caused by a thorn in his foot that has now been removed. While the wolf inspects the foot, the horse gives him a mighty kick. The wolf's problem here is, I suppose, not sticking to business. There is a way of telling this fable in which the horse invents a problem with his foot, saying that the wolf would not want to eat a thorn when he eats the horse and should remove it first. That is a clever ploy to get the wolf around to where the horse can kick him. The wolf's problems in this version would be letting himself be tricked by a good story and wanting a perfect meal. Slick computer-generated art on sixteen pages of a pamphlet. The artist has a curious approach to a horse's nose and mouth: they form a gray section clearly distinct from the rest of the horse's face, which is tan.
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Shanti Publications
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