Standing Bear v. Crook: The Case for Equality under Waaxe's Law

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Nagle, Mary Kathryn
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2012
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Journal Article
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INTRODUCTION|In 1879, a full seventy-five years before the United States Supreme Court issued its decision in Brown v. Board of Education, a Ponca Indian Chief stood up in federal court and made one of the most powerful appeals for equality under the law in the history of this nation. In a federal court tucked away in the bustling cow town and railroad hub of Omaha, Nebraska, Chief Standing Bear extended his hand and made a speech. It was a simple speech-but powerful in its appeal. By extending his hand and acknowledging that it was not white in color, Standing Bear asked the court to find he was a person under the law-despite the fact that he was an Indian in race...
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45 Creighton L. Rev. 455 (2011-2012)
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Creighton University School of Law
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