Mixed Opinions Regarding Deference to State Custodial Determinations: Another Round of 28 U.S.C. 2254(d) Classification in Thompson v. Keohane

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Authors
Carling, Matthew DeLyle
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1997
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INTRODUCTION|In Miranda v. Arizona, the United States Supreme Court acknowledged that in-custody interrogations placed inherently compelling pressures on the persons being interrogated. In an attempt to protect unsuspecting individuals from self-incrimination, the Miranda Court held that suspects questioned while in custody must be informed of their "right to remain silent" and the right to counsel during the interrogation. In Miranda, the Supreme Court defined "custodial interrogations" as "questioning initiated by law enforcement officers after a person has been taken into custody or otherwise deprived of his freedom of action in any significant way"...
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30 Creighton L. Rev. 605 (1996-1997)
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Creighton University School of Law
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