Eggs That Were Never Peacocks; Or Fables and Facts Designed to Teach Child-Wisdom

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Authors
Lee, Frances
Locke, Una
Issue Date
1869
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Book, Whole
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This is a small volume (about 4 x 6) containing nineteen teaching stories on some 136 pages. The title-story introduces us to Hugo the peacock, who thinks that the farm, its barn, the family that works it, and all the other animals on the farm are there to admire and to serve him. The story thus begins as a delightful exercise in egocentrism. Soon enough, the story moves to Maude, who has laid her first peacock-eggs and wants to hatch them before blundering Hugo breaks them. Alas, first peacock-eggs never hatch! The final paragraphs of the story suggest any number of future events. The author rounds off this story with a lesson on God's care for every individual. The title-page had indicated, after all, that the book was published by Hitchcock and Walden's Sunday-School Department. The second story, Sour Grapes in a New Form (25), follows the lives of several flies in a New England home during spring; it urges Be content with such things as ye have. What a lovely gift!
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NY: Carlton & Lanahan; Cincinnati: Hitchcock & Walden
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