Aus den Fabeln Johann Heinrich Pestalozzis

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Authors
Pestalozzi, Johann Heinrich
Issue Date
1936
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Book, Whole
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This is a beautifully printed book, complete with dust-jacket. I have not had much of a chance to enjoy Pestalozzi's fables before. They are thoughtful and perhaps sometimes over-thought-out. Good examples here are The Mountain and the Plain (15). I am higher than you gets this answer: Maybe, but I am everything, and you are only an exception from me. As often, Pestalozzi adds a comment that helps suggest the metaphorical upshot of the fable: the part would be so delighted to be more than the whole! A storm broke a branch from trees here and there. When the storm was over, snow began to fall -- and brought a thousand branches off the trees for every one that the storm had brought down (20). The dying lion told his confessor the goat that he would be delighted to hear that his sons would not be as bloodthirsty against other animals as he had been. The goat answered: Be careful not to make the dying virtue of your last hour into the life virtue of your race (116). Each fable gets one page. Rare exceptions flow over onto a second page. Each fable's title is in red. The script is Gothic. Some vocabulary is clarified on 188, and the next three pages present a T of C. On the last page (192), the editor identifies his source for the fables.
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Zollikofer & Co.
Zollikopfer & Co. Verlag
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