Les Fables de La Fontaine: Livres IV, V, VI

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Authors
Jean de La Fontaine
Issue Date
1953
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Book, Whole
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Abstract
There is with this Volume II a separate card from J.A. Bressy, mentioned as Chièze's collaborator in the colophon on 131 of Volume I. The card, presents a wood engraving of the church of St. Gervais in Paris. Bressy writes on this New Year's greeting that the illustration was done by Chièze, "l'artiste de votre La Fontaine." This unbound volume consists of 132 pages in eight page segments gathered in a portfolio of boards and enclosed in a box. Each fable begins on a new page. The frontispiece shows La Fontaine napping in the greenery near a chateau and its waters. The very first illustration shows the lion at the feet of the woman he would marry, while a man rushes up with a pliers to remove his teeth and claws (7). The ass is just climbing onto his master's lap, as the lord shields the lady and help comes to beat the poor envious beast (17). FM is pictured differently here: the kite has caught the string connecting the two. Both are flying through the air struggling (29). "The Old Woman and the Two Servants" (66) presents a wonderful contrast and uses light admirably. GGE might remind one of Van Gogh (78). TB takes the woods seriously (89). The stag seeing itself in the water is already surrounded by wonderfully curvaceous branches (109). "The Horse and the Ass" uses contrast to make the fable's point, I think, clear from the start (122). Not in Bodemann.
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Chez Pierre Bricage
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