The American Spelling Book

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Authors
Webster, Noah
Issue Date
1817
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Book, Whole
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Now here is a worn book! It has been well used and well eaten! Amid all its good things are eight fables on 83-98. New to me are The Boy That Stole Apples (83) and The Fox and the Bramble (92). The Cat and the Rat (90) is told in an unusual fashion that puts together hanging and rolling in flour, which are usually alternative ways of telling the story. Further, the cat is hanging to suggest that it has committed some misdemeanor. TB (94) adds an unusual agreement beforehand that the two would help each other if assaulted. Further stories: MM (85), The Fox and the Swallow (and flies, 87), The Two Dogs (96), and The Partial Judge (98). My favorite illustration is that of the apple-stealing boy sitting in the tree and refusing to come down (83). These fables are followed shortly by a history of the creation of the world. The grand total of the U.S. population (114) is given as 9.6 million.
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Published by Holbrook and Fessenden
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