Mythoi tou Aisopou, Tomos 2os

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2005
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Book, Whole
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This attractive large-format book offers four fables, each receiving about eight pages and a longish prose text. FWT presents a lively female fox who dresses up as a fashion statement after she has lost her tail. Her tight pants and short tail are noticed by even the birds and, of course, the skirt-wearing grandma fox with granny glasses. The second fable is apparently Perry 233, The Swan and his Owner. They say that swans sing when about to die. Someone bought a swan because he had heard that it was a very melodious bird. Then once, when he had guests for dinner, he urged the swan to sing for the company, but the swan remained silent. Later on, when the swan sensed that he was about to die, he sang a dirge for himself, and his owner hearing it said 'If you sing only when you are going to die, it was foolish of me to ask you to sing instead of sacrificing you.' Next up is The Monkey and the Fox, where the latter reveals the former's ineptitude for kingship by getting him caught in a trap. My prize for the liveliest illustration in a lively book goes to the picture here of the monkey doing her hair (26-27). The climax picture is also excellent: the supposed queen is trapped and befuddled (32). The black wolves on 38 of BW are also excellent. The endpapers offer a clue that FC appears in Volume I, now out of print. An indication on the book's cover, which shows BW, indicates that the book has a matching CD. There is no sign of that CD here.
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Ekdoseis Agyra
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