Le Soleil et le Vent: Une Fable d'Ésope

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2010
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I knew this book from its origin, The Contest Between the Sun and the Wind: An Aesop's Fable published by August House in 2008. Like its original, this French version follows the correct version of the fable. Forest tells the whole story well. The art does a good job of matching the two forces, e.g., when they together form a circle on the title-page. Gaber can use two pages together for a landscape view, as when the man bends with the wind, or for a portrait view on the following pages, when the wind blows harder and the man holds onto his coat. Here there is no contact or interchange between the two rounds; the wind simply blusters off. The man in the sunshine not only unbuttons his coat. He also sings out loud. Finally, he takes off his coat and sits in a shady spot. The wind returns and tells the sun that he cannot imagine that the sun could do any better than he did. The sun shows him the man sitting and playing his flute. How did you FORCE him to take off his coat! The sun answers that he won his way through gentleness. When the wind opines that there must have been a trick, the sun offers to show him the don and the choix that did it. The story wisely does not give the wind's answer. The author adds only The Sun just smiled…. This lovely book is dedicated to tous les Gens de paix.
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