Armenian Folk Fables

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2012
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Book, Whole
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Here is a curious little book (6 x 8¼) of 158 pages with so many texts that the closing T of C needs eight pages. The texts are a collection of all sorts of clever stories. Generally these stories show good peasant wisdom, like Wife and Mother (27): I would rather have happen to me what my wife thinks about when I travel than what my mother fears when I travel. A good number of the stories are recognizable traditional fables, including the following: The Oak and the Pumpkin (5); The Dog and the Deer (22); The Fox Divisor (34); FC (41); BC (41); The Tongue Is the Sweetest and the Bitterest (44); The Pilgrim Fox and the Cock (58); GA (59); The Miser Burying His Gold (63); The Camel Prefers the Level (73); The Pig and the Singing Wolf (83, with an image); The Dying Lion and the Donkey (108); The Nut and the Watermelon (125, in which one usually finds a pumpkin); and The Scorpion and the Frog (149). New to me but like some fables is The Dying Defecating Ass (111). The Snake and the Lark (76) not only has one of the best images; that image is repeated on every text page. The illustration style is distinctive, as is clear from the cover image of a blind man carrying a lantern. He does it, of course, not so that he can see but so that others can see him.
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EditPrint Publishing House
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