Evaluation of a Free Smoking Cessation Program in North Omaha

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Authors
Hoskey, Christa
Howell, Eleanor
Issue Date
2014-06-03 , 2014-06-03
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Smoking Cessation Program
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Abstract
Nicotine dependence, specifically smoking cigarettes, is a significant healthcare and societal issue. Tobacco use is the number one cause of preventable morbidity and mortality in the United States. Socioeconomic status plays a role in smoking habits and is a major determinant of tobacco-related health disparities. Smoking cessation is a cost-effective preventive care service that allows for reallocation of funds spent on cigarettes. A smoking cessation program was designed with the goal of increasing smoking cessation rates in underserved, vulnerable populations. The program used evidence-based guidelines, Nicotine Replacement Therapy (NRT), and individualized support and follow-up, and was implemented in a free clinic setting. An evaluation was conducted at the 8-week point. Out of 15 program participants, 4 participants completed the eight weeks. Of the four completers, three (75%) cut back on the number of cigarettes smoked and one (25%) was smoking just as many cigarettes as prior to the program. Participants’ triggers to smoking included stress, negative emotions, habits, and set-backs to quitting. Participants reported satisfaction with the resources, support, and convenience of the smoking cessation program, and preferred nicotine patches over nicotine gum. Participants offered suggestions on improving the program and increasing the availability of smoking cessation programs for the free clinic community
Nicotine dependence, specifically smoking cigarettes, is a significant healthcare and societal issue. Tobacco use is the number one cause of preventable morbidity and mortality in the United States. Socioeconomic status plays a role in smoking habits and is a major determinant of tobacco-related health disparities. Smoking cessation is a cost-effective preventive care service that allows for reallocation of funds spent on cigarettes. A smoking cessation program was designed with the goal of increasing smoking cessation rates in underserved, vulnerable populations. The program used evidence-based guidelines, Nicotine Replacement Therapy (NRT), and individualized support and follow-up, and was implemented in a free clinic setting. An evaluation was conducted at the 8-week point. Out of 15 program participants, 4 participants completed the eight weeks. Of the four completers, three (75%) cut back on the number of cigarettes smoked and one (25%) was smoking just as many cigarettes as prior to the program. Participants' triggers to smoking included stress, negative emotions, habits, and set-backs to quitting. Participants reported satisfaction with the resources, support, and convenience of the smoking cessation program, and preferred nicotine patches over nicotine gum. Participants offered suggestions on improving the program and increasing the availability of smoking cessation programs for the free clinic community
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Contact for permission to quote at: Christa.Hoskey@gmail.com
Copyright is retained by the Author. A non-exclusive distribution right is granted to Creighton University
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