Fifty Fables in German: A Parallel Reader

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Sheppard, Clinton
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2018
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Here is a curious book, 7½” x 9½”, containing fifty numbered fables. Each fable is presented in parallel German and English columns, with specific words numbered to correspond with words or phrases in the other column. The approach to language learning helps to make the book worth thinking about. For me, it is a good experience to wonder about a word and immediately look at its counterpart in the other language. Such is, as I understand it, the approach John Locke proposed for learning Latin. The back cover claims that this practice helps “to study the differences between the two languages.” Does it? The fables are a mix, apparently straight from Schmid in 1800. Perhaps a half-dozen are standard Aesopic fare, like “The Overburdened Ass” (#14); TB (#20); and “Acorn and Pumpkin” (#41). BW (#21) has a surprise ending: the wolf eats the boy up! “The Stolen Horse” (#26) is a good fable. To disprove claims about horse ownership, ask “In which eye is the horse blind?” He is in fact not blind in either eye! There are extensive vocabulary listings at the back.
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Clinton Sheppard: Goodreads
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