Pakistan's Foreign Policy

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Authors
Khan, Sultan Muhammad
Issue Date
1972-10-17
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BIOGRAPHICAL NOTE|Mr. Sultan Muhammad Khan was educated at the Allahabad University and commissioned in the Indian Army in 1942, where he served in different assignments in the Far-East. At the end of the War in 1946, he was selected and appointed to the Civil Service. At the time of Independece, Mr. Khan was appointed at the Pakistan High Commission, New Delhi. Thereafter, he served in Pakistan Missions at Cairo and Rome. He served in External Affairs Ministry as a Director and during this period he also acted as Secretary to the Pakistan Steering Committee on Indo-Pakistan issues. He was posted to China as Ambassador in 1966; appointed foreign secretary in January 1970, and Ambassador to USA in April 1972
SUMMARY| Khan's approach to his subject - Pakistan's foreign policy - was historical; he began 800 years ago and in about 40 minutes brought us to the 1947 separation and beyond, concluding with general observations of Pakistan's relations with the US, USSR, and PRC. His attitude toward relations with the US since independent was "If we got US help, we paid for it" by alienating the USSR, pushing the USSR into supporting India, by frustrating relations with the PRC, though he felt the latter had "understood" and "tolerated" Pakistan's position over the years. He contended that India was not upholding its end of the Simla Agreement.
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