Sovereignty, Salt, and Space: The Linkages Between International Space Law and the International System

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Authors
Payne, Charles W. Jr.
Issue Date
1977
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Thesis
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en_US
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Abstract
In October 1957 the USSR launched SPUTNIK, the first artificial satellite to be placed into orbit around the earth. The United States launched the second satellite the following summer. These events began the unique development in a relatively short time of a new dimension of international law. | Of particular interest in this new dimension are the linkages among the concept of territorial sovereignty, the functional bounds of space activities, and the verifications of strategic arms limitation as they relate to the development of international space law. The thesis of this research has been that such linkages exist and support the continuing development of international space law. This report addresses, first, a modification of the definition of territorial sovereignty, a sine qua non for the remainder of the argument. Second, it examines the use of functional bounds of space activities to establish the relationship between these and jurisdictional claims and treaty law. Finally, the verification process of strategic arms limitation proves to be both a source and a product of international law. The report closes with projections of its findings upon future plans of states for the use of space. This report, then, presents further evidence of the interdependence of international law and its encompassing international system.
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Creighton University
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A non-exclusive distribution right is granted to Creighton University and to ProQuest following the publishing model selected above.
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