L.E. Factor Test in Acute Disseminated Lupus Erythematosus

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Authors
Walsh, John Richard
Issue Date
1951
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Thesis
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en_US
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Abstract
Systemic lupus erythematosus is a rare disease. And like other rare diseases it becomes scarcer through lack of consideration. Therefore a high index of suspicion is necessary if the diagnosis is to be made more frequently. Before the discovery of a new diagnostic test, acute disseminated lupus erythematosus was a medical curiosity. A few years ago the diagnosis was made with certainty only when the classical picture was encountered. A few astute physicians made the diagnosis in obscure cases but always with some hesitancy. A typical cell was discovered which is diagnostic of the disease and an entity once obscure assumed prominence in medical literature. The profession became more conscious of the disease because with a laboratory procedure there was more confidence in the diagnosis. The realization that the diagnosis has frequently been missed is becoming apparent with the utilization of diagnostic laboratory procedures. | In January 1948, Hargraves, Richmond and Morton announced the discovery of a new cell in bone marrow preparations of patients with acute disseminated lupus erythematosus. Hargraves gave the name L.E. cell to this new entity. A chain of investigations has evolved a new diagnostic procedure for this disease. Lupus erythematosus is now prominent in medical literature and is the subject of a great deal of study. Reports concerning the specificity of this cell for systemic lupus erythematosus are appearing in the literature.
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Creighton University
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