Judicially Imposed Taxation and Desegregation: Missouri v. Jenkins

dc.contributor.authorAndersen, Stanley J.en_US
dc.date.accessioned2013-02-14T22:44:43Z
dc.date.available2013-02-14T22:44:43Z
dc.date.issued1991en_US
dc.description.abstractINTRODUCTION|The federal judiciary has traditionally stated that the federal courts have no power to levy taxes. But recent federal court opinions suggest that this is no longer true. Justice Harlan F. Stone has said the only limit on the power of the United States Supreme Court is its own sense of self restraint. Part of the reason behind the movement from a limited judicial power to a judicial power limited only by the self-restraint of the justices appears to be the fear that, in some extreme cases, the judicial system will be unable to remedy a constitutional violation. Any limit on judicial power, however, will inherently leave some extreme cases where the courts will be unable to provide an adequate remedy...en_US
dc.description.note1990-1991en_US
dc.description.pages289en_US
dc.description.volume24en_US
dc.identifier.citation24 Creighton L. Rev. 289 (1990-1991)en_US
dc.identifier.urihttp://hdl.handle.net/10504/39847
dc.publisherCreighton University School of Lawen_US
dc.publisher.locationOmaha, Nebraskaen_US
dc.rights.holderCreighton Universityen_US
dc.time.yr1990-1991
dc.titleJudicially Imposed Taxation and Desegregation: Missouri v. Jenkinsen_US
dc.title.workCreighton Law Reviewen_US
dc.typeJournal Article
Files
Original bundle
Now showing 1 - 1 of 1
No Thumbnail Available
Name:
16_24CreightonLRev289(1990-1991).pdf
Size:
1.33 MB
Format:
Adobe Portable Document Format
License bundle
Now showing 1 - 1 of 1
No Thumbnail Available
Name:
license.txt
Size:
1.71 KB
Format:
Item-specific license agreed upon to submission
Description: