Schools, Clubs, and Enterprise: Clusters of Social and Religious Coexistence in Ottoman Salonica

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Authors
Bouroutis, Andreas K.
Issue Date
2019
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Journal Article
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Abstract
By the turn of the twentieth century, considerable change in several aspects of social life was obvious in the Levantine ports, stemming largely as a result of developments in the Ottoman economy and expansion of trade in the eastern Mediterranean region. Salonica (modern-day Thessaloniki), one of the main commercial hubs of Balkan trade, profited greatly by this development. As a result, the establishment of the first European schools in Salonica, in 1888, signaled a major turn in the outlook of the city, and provided evidence for the fact that a sufficient number of people were ready to entrust the new environment with their children’s western education and exposure to different cultures. Along with the rise of international schools a rising number of clubs were established, confirming that a new and diverse bourgeois class had been shaped, enjoying expanded ties through social contacts and economic networks. When the first labor strikes broke out in 1908, there was no ethnic or religious component, only a class distinction. Whether Jew, Muslim, or Orthodox Greek or Bulgarian, or others, workers of all stripes united for their rights in demanding better wages and working conditions. The aim of this paper is to present a transnational approach to life in Salonica at the beginning of the twentieth century, tracing the interactive limitations among various communities during the rise of religious and ethno-nationalism. |Keywords: Coexistence, bourgeoisie, working class, international schools, enterprises, religion, ethno-nationalism
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Bouroutis, A. K. (2019). Schools, Clubs, and Enterprise: Clusters of Social and Religious Coexistence in Ottoman Salonica. Supplement Series for the Journal of Religion & Society Supplement Series, 19, 67-82.
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Rabbi Myer and Dorothy Kripke Center, Creighton University
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The journal is open-access and freely allows users to read, download, copy, distribute, print, search, or link to the full texts of all published material for personal or academic purposes.
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1941-8450
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