Outfoxing Fear: Folktales from Around the World

dc.acquired.locationPowell's, Portlanden_US
dc.contributor.authorRagan, Kathleenen_US
dc.contributor.otherIntroduction by Jack Zipesen_US
dc.cost.usCost: 7.98en_US
dc.date.accessioned2016-08-26T13:38:59Z
dc.date.acquired2015-07en_US
dc.date.available2016-08-26T13:38:59Z
dc.date.issued2006en_US
dc.date.printed2006en_US
dc.description.abstract"This book is written in the wake of 9/11. It offers lots of helpful story perspectives on dealing with fear in a frightening world. I am happy that several fables make their way into this collection. I may have missed others, but I see these at work here. "The Frightened Fox" (29) is a clever story. They are rounding up camels. The fox knows enough to be afraid. The mob could well take him for a camel! "The Snail" gets across the road in seven years. Just as he makes it across, a tree falls and just misses him. "It's good to be fast," he says (62). "The Fox and Her Children and Nekhailo the Loafer" is a variation of the Aesopic "Lark and Her Children" (80). Young foxes hear Nekhailo notice that the grass needs weeding. Mother answers "Don't be afraid." Nekhailo returns after a long time; the grass has grown tall. "I'll come back with a scythe." "Don't be afraid." Three months later comes with a scythe, but the grass is so thick that he cannot cut it down. "I'll go get some matches and burn it." "Come, children, now we'd better run away!" (80). "The Lion Who Drowned in a Well" (82) and "The Tiger, the Brahman, and the Jackal" (86) are familiar fables. "Ole Sis Goose" (104) takes the attacking fox to the courthouse, but the judge, the sheriff, the attorneys, and the jury all are foxes! Guess who wins the trial! "The Landlord and His Son" (130) does indeed illustrate that "Wer anderen eine Grube gräbt, fällt selbst hinein." "The Good Lie" (217) tells a good story of just that: a vizier translates a foreign captive's outburst as a verse from the Koran praising compassion -- and the captive is spared. Another counselor speaks up to say "He lied." The king says he prefers the first vizier's lie to the second vizier's truth: it brought a good action. Ragan adds a touching last chapter: "Sunrise Never Failed Us Yet." For something totally different, try "De White Man's Prayer" (75)."en_US
dc.description.note3First printingen_US
dc.description.statementofresponsibilityKathleen Raganen_US
dc.identifier.other10849 (Access ID)en_US
dc.identifier.urihttp://hdl.handle.net/10504/91447
dc.languageengen_US
dc.printer.locationUSAen_US
dc.publisherW.W. Nortonen_US
dc.publisher.locationNYen_US
dc.subject.lccGR74.R34 2006en_US
dc.subject.local1Collectionen_US
dc.subject.local4Title Page Scanneden_US
dc.time.yr2006
dc.titleOutfoxing Fear: Folktales from Around the Worlden_US
dc.typeBook, Whole
dc.url.link1http://creighton-primo.hosted.exlibrisgroup.com/primo_library/libweb/action/search.do?fn=search&ct=search&initialSearch=true&mode=Basic&tab=default_tab&indx=1&dum=true&srt=rank&vid=01CRU&frbg=&tb=t&vl%28freeText0%29=991005486624702656&scp.scps=scope%3A%2801CRU%29%2Cscope%3A%2801CRU_ALMA
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