Utter Disregard for Precedent: Misconstruing Commerce Clause Precedent in United States v. Lopez, An

dc.contributor.authorLikes, Steven Christopheren_US
dc.date.accessioned2013-02-15T18:29:11Z
dc.date.available2013-02-15T18:29:11Z
dc.date.issued1996en_US
dc.description.abstractINTRODUCTION|In Gibbons v. Ogden, the United States Supreme Court issued one of the earliest interpretations of the Commerce Clause and held that only Congress possessed the power to regulate interstate commerce. Since the 1824 decision of Gibbons, the Supreme Court has recognized that Congress has the authority to regulate articles of commerce, instrumentalities that restrain the flow of commerce, and intrastate activities that substantially affect commerce. Following Gibbons, the regulation of intrastate activities proved to be a source of dispute between the legislative and the judicial branches, because the Court often interjected its own idea of what constituted commerce and struck down regulations that did not comport with its views...en_US
dc.description.note1995-1996en_US
dc.description.pages811en_US
dc.description.volume29en_US
dc.identifier.citation29 Creighton L. Rev. 811 (1995-1996)en_US
dc.identifier.urihttp://hdl.handle.net/10504/40138
dc.publisherCreighton University School of Lawen_US
dc.publisher.locationOmaha, Nebraskaen_US
dc.rights.holderCreighton Universityen_US
dc.time.yr1995-1996
dc.titleUtter Disregard for Precedent: Misconstruing Commerce Clause Precedent in United States v. Lopez, Anen_US
dc.title.workCreighton Law Reviewen_US
dc.typeJournal Articleen_US
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