Le Monde Selon Jean De…

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Authors
Besré, Jean
Jorisch, Stéphane
La Fontaine, Jean de
Vandal, André
Issue Date
1992
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Book, Whole
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This is a 48-page booklet created to accompany an audio cassette, vendue séparatement. LaFontaine introduced to France the only moral genre that had popular success: the fables. The booklet starts with impressionistic watercolors of figures contemporary with La Fontaine, including royalty, patrons, and other writers. Then the fables begin, and we realize that this booklet offers seriously creative illustrations of La Fontaine's fables. The illustration for the first fable, MSA, starts off with a bang. Father and son are contemporary with us, riding scooter and roller-horse respectively, wearing earphones and listening to their music players. The houses which they pass have TV screens laughing at the two humans. In the illustration for the following fable, Le Savetier et le Financier, the banker hugs huge piggy banks behind the bars of his temple/bank/prison (12). I enjoy this volume not least for illustrating, in its typically biting way, several lesser-known fables, like Le Milan, le Roi, et le Chasseur (15) and Le Loup et le Renard (25). TH here is excellent: a trudging man (the tortoise) climbs stairs while a harried fellow (the hare) runs to the broken elevator (27). In The Monkey and the Cat (31), one set of robbers steals the full truck of another set of robbers! OR contrasts a muscular trapeze-artist with a more willowy tightrope walker using a balancing pole (33). This is a delightful, thought-provoking book! At the end there is a French-to-French dictionary of some terms (44-47).
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