The Lyrical Strain in Shakespeare's Early Dramas

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Authors
Welch, M. James C.S.J.
Issue Date
1950
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Thesis
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en_US
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Shakespeare
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Abstract
The lyrical strain in Shakespeare's early drama is "brought out "by Chambers in his statement that |"With Romeo and Juliet and A Midsummer Night's Dream, it (Richard the Second) belongs to the period of a deliberate literary experiment. For the space of a tragedy, a comedy, and a history, Shakespeare essayed to write drama in the lyrical vein, with his singing robe a on, with an abundance of passionate and highly coloured speech, and with the aid of rhyme and other devices of lyrical utterance." |Chambers expresses the opinion that Richard the Second is unlike the history play, Henry the Sixth; A Midsummer Nights Dream is different from that of As You Like It; and Romeo and Juliet is quite dissimilar to that of Hamlet or Macbeth, in that Richard the Second, A Midsummer Night's Dream, and Romeo and Juliet are treated of in light, airy, lyrical passages.
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Creighton University
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A non-exclusive distribution right is granted to Creighton University and to ProQuest following the publishing model selected above.
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