Faculty Bibliography Database

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The Faculty Bibliography Database is produced as a joint project of the Graduate School and the Health Sciences Library. The bibliography is updated monthly based on material found in scholarly bibliographic databases and supplemented in the fall with personal bibliographies provided by the faculty.

Author's names are provided as is. The Creighton Authors listing provides standardized names so that all the works of a particular faculty author can be retrieved with a single click.

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Now showing 1 - 5 of 13894
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    Realigning incentives for novel pain therapeutics
    (2022) Sinha, Michael S.; Dineen, Kelly K.
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    Dynasty 529 plans and structural inequality,
    (2022) Haneman, Victoria J.
    The tax advantages available through 529 accounts, such as the potential for perpetual tax-free growth, have been maximized by the wealth defense industry that operates to the advantage of high income and wealth families in the United States. This essay is more a thought piece than a polemic, with the goal of starting a conversation on an important issue not often discussed: a 2018 change to the 529 structure slipped into the Tax Cuts and Jobs Act (TCJA) has essentially turned 529 plans into a government-subsidized school voucher scheme for the wealthy. Through this change, the dynasty education trust has become an even more attractive umbrella under which multiple 529 accounts may be managed by an affluent family to pay not just for college but also all private school (K-12) on a tax-sheltered basis.
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    Athletes in transit: Why the game is different in sports and the visas should be too
    (2022) Weber, David P.
    At least as early as the ancient Olympic games, athletes have traveled to engage in competition. Participation in the games was so revered that military truces were enacted to secure the safety of spectators and athletes alike. In modern times, we can look to the holding of the first modern Olympics in 1896, followed a few decades later in 1930 with the first World Cup as the forefathers of modern international travel for athletes. And of course, this trend followed with the professionalization of sports and the desires of teams and fans to have the best and most commercially successful athletes. U.S. immigration law should be designed and interpreted to facilitate the entry of skilled athletes. Part I of this article provides a background of the current state of visas for both professional and amateur athletes, and e-gamers. Part I also examines potential issues of concern if the NCAA moves to allow student athletes to earn money from the name, image, and likeness. Part II examines the joint economic gains uniquely captured in sport through the importation of foreign players, and demonstrates that the interests of owners, players, and fans are uniquely aligned through the importation of foreign superstar talent. Part III examines how the Trump Administration tightened eligibility requirements through its interpretation and application of EB-1, P, and O visa guidelines over the past 4 years resulting in much greater rates of denial than at any time since the enactment of the COMPETE Act in 2006. Part III also proposes three immediate solutions: new regulations to allow foreign student athletes to earn money from their name, image, and likeness in accordance with proposed NCAA rule changes regarding name, image, and likeness (NIL); a clear category for e-gaming athletes as the field is primed for explosive growth over the next ten years; and a looser interpretation of the requirements for certain visas when utilized by athletes.
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    Prepaid death
    (2022) Haneman, Victoria J.
    The cost of an adult funeral exceeds $9,000. Funerals are expensive and death is not considered an appropriate time to bargain shop. The consumer is generally inexpert and vulnerable due to bereavement. Decisions are often time-pressured and perceived as irreversibly final. Accordingly, the death care industry benefits both from information asymmetry and etiquette uncertainty. Protecting the bereaved consumer calls for reversing the current norm of at-need (after death) purchasing in favor of pre-need (before death) planning and prepayment. Due to excessive influence of the industry over its state regulators, referred to as regulatory capture, current pre-need prepayment instruments are so deeply flawed that conventional wisdom recommends against prepayment. This Article borrows from nudge theory to shape an intervention that will correct unfairness and inefficiency in an imperfect market, in a way that deftly sidesteps an all-out attack on the industry itself. The proposed paradigm shapes an incentive that allows the consumer to pay for pre-need death care service with pre-tax earnings through Internal Revenue Code Section 125 and flexible spending account principles. Untangling regulatory capture becomes unnecessary: federal tax-sheltering of pre-need prepayment dollars will generate consumer demand for reliable and qualified pre-need prepayment financial instruments. This increased demand for pre-need instruments will, in turn, provide an incentive for funeral providers to offer the attractive terms necessary to compete for this new base.
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    Treating workers as essential too: an ethical framework for public health interventions to prevent and control COVID-19 infections among meat-processing facility workers and their communities in the United States
    (2022) Dineen, Kelly K.; Lowe, Abigail; Kass, Nancy E.; Wynia, Matthew K.; Voo, Teck Chuan; Mohapatra, Seema; Lookadoo, Rachel; Ramos, Athena K.; Herstein, Jocelyn J.; Donovan, Sara; Lawler, James V.; Lowe, John J.; Schwedhelm, Shelly; Sederstrom, Nneka O.
    Meat is a multi-billion-dollar industry that relies on people performing risky physical work inside meat-processing facilities over long shifts in close proximity. These workers are socially disempowered, and many are members of groups beset by historic and ongoing structural discrimination. The combination of working conditions and worker characteristics facilitate the spread of SARS-CoV-2, the virus that causes COVID-19. Workers have been expected to put their health and lives at risk during the pandemic because of government and industry pressures to keep this “essential industry” producing. Numerous interventions can significantly reduce the risks to workers and their communities; however, the industry’s implementation has been sporadic and inconsistent. With a focus on the U.S. context, this paper offers an ethical framework for infection prevention and control recommendations grounded in public health values of health and safety, interdependence and solidarity, and health equity and justice, with particular attention to considerations of reciprocity, equitable burden sharing, harm reduction, and health promotion. Meat-processing workers are owed an approach that protects their health relative to the risks of harms to them, their families, and their communities. Sacrifices from businesses benefitting financially from essential industry status are ethically warranted and should acknowledge the risks assumed by workers in the context of existing structural inequities.