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Now showing 1 - 5 of 17

Recent Submissions

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    Building Collaborative Care Through the Formation of Organizational Partnerships and Interprofessional Education in Clinical Learning Environments: A Case Study
    (Creighton University, 2023) Keefner, Kristina Marie Brandon
    The purpose of this qualitative case study was to achieve an in-depth understanding of anorganizational partnership, from its inception to implementation, that has contributed to formation of a high-quality interprofessional primary care clinic model within a larger academic health system. The study also sought to detail adaptive leadership behaviors that fostered the transition from co-location to collaboration among frontline leaders within an academic healthcare workforce. Nineteen participants were selected through purposive and snowball sampling to represent the study site’s academic institution, health system, and patient-advocacy committee. In semi-structured reflective interviews and focus groups, these informants shared their perceived roles, responsibilities, and experiences. Documents and artifacts were also reviewed. Analysis and triangulation of revealed four major themes: Leadership, Shared Mission, a Culture of Collaboration, and the Quadruple Aim in the Clinical Learning Environment. The findings resulted in an evidence-informed solution for sustainable and scalable interprofessional education and collaborative practice infrastructure. The solution includes the primary recommendations of creating Interprofessional Clinical Faculty and an Interprofessional Workforce and Workplace Training Curriculum. The findings imply organizational infrastructure supports workplace learning, leading to system-wide innovation in partnership within academic and health systems to meet the shared mission of advancing an interprofessional collaborative academic medical center model. Keywords: organizational partnerships, clinical learning environment, interprofessional education and collaborative practice (IPECP)
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    Understanding Burnout and Turnover for Dual-Role Administrators: A Phenomenologic Study Understanding the Lived Experiences of Dual-Role School Superintendents and Principals
    (Creighton University, 2024) Knight, Eric
    The paper is an exploration of dual-role school district leadership in a small rural state. Dual-role leaders are individuals who fulfill all the roles of both the school superintendent and principal. Smaller rural school districts are the districts that often utilize a dual-role superintendent and principal model. The position of principal and superintendent each have their unique and required job responsibilities, the combination of roles make these job requirements difficult to complete. When these job characteristics are not completed at a high level, there are negative effects on teacher turnover, student achievement, and leadership accountability begin to reveal themselves in the district. A qualitative methods approach was used to research the phenomenon of dual-role school administrator turnover and burnout. Interviews of current dual-role administrators and former dual-role administrators who are now working in singular superintendent roles were conducted. Keywords: qualitative, phenomenon, dual-role administrator, singular-role administrator, burnout, turnover
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    Death Anxiety and Perspectives on Death in First Year Veterinary Students: A Mixed Methods Study
    (Creighton University, 2023) Brosnahan, Margaret M.
    Death is omnipresent in veterinary education and clinical practice, encountered through contact with cadavers in the anatomy and pathology labs, and with the deaths of patients in the clinical year, most often by euthanasia. Despite this, research on the attitudes that veterinary students and veterinarians hold about death is sparse, and most veterinary curricula address the subject of death inadequately relative to its gravity and to the magnitude of its presence in the lives of veterinarians. This mixed methods study investigates death anxiety, as well as attitudes about and prior experiences with death, in a cohort of first-year veterinary students. The quantitative strand included the administration of four surveys to a cohort of first year veterinary students, while the qualitative strand included interviews with a subset of the survey respondents. Death anxiety in Dimension 1 – Fear of the Dying Process on the Multidimensional Fear of Death Scale decreased significantly from the beginning to the end of the academic year. Themes emerging from qualitative data encompassed factors that mitigated or intensified the students’ reaction to an animal’s death, intense prior experiences with animal and human death, and evidence of conflicting feelings regarding cadaver use in the anatomy lab. This study generated a deeper understanding of veterinary students’ prior experiences with death, and their expectations for and reactions to death in their first year of veterinary education. These results will inform future studies and ongoing curricular development in veterinary education.
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    Knowledge Sharing Experiences Among Middle Management Leaders: A Phenomenological Study
    (Creighton University, 2023) Creamer, Nicole F.
    The findings from this study contribute to understanding what promotes tacit knowledge sharing between leader-leader interactions, encourage employee participation in knowledge sharing, and leads to successful organizational outcomes. Objectively, the purpose of this study was to understand the exchange of knowledge sharing experiences between middle-management leaders during peer-to-peer interactions, and if the interactions stimulate interdepartmental knowledge sharing. The contribution of this research pursued how and when knowledge sharing between middle-management leaders occurs, and if the interactions encourage interdepartmental knowledge sharing activities. The literature presented throughout the study highlights the challenges organizations and leaders face with communication of tacit knowledge, the storage of tacit knowledge, and the multiple leadership elements that influence knowledge sharing. Applying a phenomenological approach to comprehend the lived experiences of leaders during peer-to-peer interactions supported the purpose of the study and collecting information through personal interviews contributed to the rich data that developed the themes including the value of knowledge sharing among peers, a need for leader growth and development, and identification of gaps in communication. Lastly, a proposed recommendation that incorporates an integrated leadership development program into the organization’s culture, that flourishes over time by shaping tacit knowledge sharing principles and streamlining knowledge sharing consistently. Keywords: asymmetrical information, explicit knowledge, knowledge hoarding, knowledge sharing, peer-to-peer, tacit knowledge
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    State v. Williams: The Court of Criminal Appeals of Tennessee Incorrectly Allowed Rap Lyrics as Evidence to Prove the Character of the Accused
    (Creighton University School of Law, 2024-04) Kasamoto, Bryce
    To begin the determination of whether the Court of Criminal Appeals of Tennessee correctly allowed the rap video in State v. Williams as character evidence, this Note will first review the facts and holding of Williams. This Note will then generally review the development of the rap genre and the stigmas that followed it. This Note will then review cases that display the modern trend of courts limiting the admission of rap lyrics as character evidence to prove intent. Lastly, this Note will argue the Court of Criminal Appeals of Tennessee incorrectly allowed the rap video in State v. Williams as character evidence, and that courts should follow the “direct connection between lyrics and the crime in question” standard outline in Skinner.