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Now showing 1 - 5 of 17

Recent Submissions

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    What is the effectiveness of Myofascial release on pain management in individuals with fibromyalgia?
    (Creighton University, 2024-04-24) Cross, Abigail; Goetzinger, Alli; Knutson, Abby; Wright, Emma; Wright, Hannah
    Fibromyalgia is defined as a long-lasting disorder that causes pain, stiffness, fatigue, and tenderness throughout the body due to altered signaling in the neural pathways. Around 5 million Americans will be diagnosed with fibromyalgia this year alone. Of those diagnosed, 5.6% of them will be females in the ages of 35-55 years old. Many individuals diagnosed with fibromyalgia report widespread pain, muscle tightness, fatigue, and muscle weakness. These symptoms greatly impact participation in occupations such as activities of daily living (ADL), social participation, and work. Currently, the treatment for fibromyalgia is multidisciplined, incorporating cognitive therapy, medication, massage, and exercise. The purpose of this analysis is to critically appraise the intervention of massage via the form of myofascial release on pain reduction in patients with fibromyalgia. Level 1A systematic reviews were analyzed and included in the CAT if they were published in the last 10 years. These articles included information about the effectiveness of myofascial release on the reduction of pain and the impact myofascial release has on the quality of life in individuals diagnosed with fibromyalgia. The analysis showed that myofascial release decreases widespread body pain and increases occupational participation among individuals who received the intervention. The intervention of myofascial release requires more research to determine the effective duration and frequency of myofascial release protocol in individuals with fibromyalgia.
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    What is the effectiveness of constraint-induced movement therapy (CIMT) on improving occupational participation for children who have hemiplegia and hemiparesis?
    (Creighton University, 2025) Boomgaard , Karlee; Docheff , Jaycee; Knudsen , Savanna; Rollo, Karilyn; Winkler , Madelaine
    As of 2024, roughly 4,000 babies and 73,062 children in the United States are impacted by hemiplegia. Hemiplegia is defined as a neurological condition that presents paralysis of one side of the body. Whereas hemiparesis presents as muscle weakness on one side of the body resulting from neurological trauma such as infection, stroke, injury, or genetic mutations. Children experiencing these conditions subsequently face limitations in their occupational performance for tasks such as getting dressed, grooming, hygiene, and leisure activities. The purpose of this analysis was to critically assess methods of constraint-induced movement therapy (CIMT) and their resulting effectiveness in addressing occupational performance deficits for children aged 0-21. Treatment durations are most effective when protocols are intensive, with most trials within the research demonstrating the use of CIMT from 3-10 weeks with varying intervention lengths from 1-5 hours per day. Peer-reviewed research was included if published within the last nine years, the level of evidence was 1B, 2A, and 2B, and it was fully accessible online. Through this critical analysis, strong evidence is found supporting CIMT to be effective in improving occupational performance for this population in conjunction with bimanual task therapy interventions.
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    Improving feeding tolerance in extremely low birth weight Infants with early intermittent bolus administration
    (Creighton University, 2024-04-24) Reefe, Courtney
    Purpose: The purpose of this project was to improve feeding tolerance through adaptation of the existing feeding protocol to initiate feedings via continuous drip to intermittent bolus method for extremely low birth weight infants in the NICU. Background: Extremely low birth weight infants are at a higher risk for feeding intolerance and delays in enteral feeding due to immature gastrointestinal systems, which has significant consequences for morbidity, mortality, as well as length of hospitalization and healthcare costs. The current literature suggests early implementation of bolus feeding to improve feeding tolerance and support the normal feed-fast cycles of gastrointestinal physiology, therefore promoting enteral maturation, neurodevelopment, and somatic growth. Sample/Setting: This QI project took place in the 36-bed Level III NICU at CHI CUMC Bergan Mercy Medical Center in Omaha, Nebraska. In 2021, there were 667 infants admitted to this NICU and approximately 6% were ELBW infants. All infants born weighing <1,000 g and/or at a gestational age <29 weeks, and admitted into unit within 24 hours of birth were included in this project. Methods: This was a quality improvement project where patient data was collected via chart review. Data was analyzed using descriptive statistics. Results: There was not a significant decrease in incidence rate of feeding intolerance between the Pre- and Post-groups. Both the mean time for initiation of enteral feedings and achievement of full feeding volume and TPN discontinuation decreased by 5 hours and 1.4 days, respectively. The overall adherence rate for feeding protocol adherence improved by 28.5%. Conclusion: Findings of this quality improvement project suggest initiation of feedings via intermittent bolus could promote earlier achievement of full feeding volume in ELBW infants. Further research is needed to determine an optimal standardized feeding protocol in order to determine the most effective and physiologically appropriate feeding strategy for ELBW infants.
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    What is the effectiveness of constraint-induced movement therapy (CIMT) on improvement in upper extremity functioning in children with cerebral palsy (CP)?
    (Creighton University, 2024-04-24) Hirata, Caitlin; Marshall, Anna; Mount, Brianna; Nelson, Anna; Puck, Anna
    BACKGROUND: Cerebral palsy (CP) is a common nondegenerative neurodevelopmental condition caused by a brain injury occurring prior to or during birth. This condition is the most common motor disability seen in 1 in 323 children in the United States. Children with CP live with various symptoms including abnormal tone, decreased balance, decreased posture, and coordination difficulties. This condition often affects children’s activities of daily living (ADLs) and instrumental activities of daily living (IADLs), including bathing, dressing, self-care, play, and feeding. AIM: This critically appraised topic (CAT) is aimed to determine the effectiveness of constraint-induced movement therapy (CIMT) for children with cerebral palsy (CP) on improving upper extremity function. METHODS: Level 1A, 1B, and 2B peer-reviewed journal articles published within the last 10 years were analyzed. Articles had to include participants that were children with a clinical diagnosis of cerebral palsy (CP) who were less than 21 years old, interventions of modified constraint-induced movement therapy (mCIMT) or constraint-induced movement therapy (CIMT), with outcomes related to upper extremity function. Seven studies were included that met the established standards. RESULTS: Level 1A, 1B, and 2B research was completed on the use of CIMT, which revealed positive evidence regarding the effectiveness of CIMT on improving activity level, participation, upper body function, functional hand use, and motor skills in children diagnosed with hemiplegic CP. Further RCTs with a larger sample size and refinement of treatment protocols should be completed to increase the strength of evidence for CIMT.
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    Critically Appraised Topic (CAT)
    (Creighton University, 2024-04-23) Bevilaqua, Anna; Bruno, Renée; Cozza, Morgan; Steinmetz, Riley
    Background: Stroke is a neurological deficit of the central nervous system, caused by reduced oxygenated blood flow to the brain or hemorrhaging arteries (Campbell & Khatri, 2020). It is the leading cause of disability within the United States, affecting almost 800,000 people every year and costing up to 56.5 billion dollars (CDC, 2023). The debilitating effect of stroke, both physically and financially has been a call to action for new rehabilitative technologies; such as robotic assisted technology (RAT). Aim: This critically appraised topic (CAT) aimed to determine the effectiveness of robotic intervention on improving upper extremity motor function within the post-stroke population. Methods: Level IA and Level IB evidence was reviewed as long as it met the following inclusion criteria; published within the past 10 years, from a peer-reviewed journal, and covered all three areas of the focus question proposed (stoke population, robotic intervention, and upper extremity motor function as an outcome). Results: Robotic assisted therapy alone does not produce statistically significant improvement for upper extremity motor function when compared to conventional therapy for stroke rehabilitation. However, with further research it could be argued that it could be implemented in conjunction with conventional therapy to promote accelerated improvement in upper extremity motor function.