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Now showing 1 - 5 of 17

Recent Submissions

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    What is the effectiveness of fabricated orthoses for adults with 3rd degree burns on the UE for maintaining functional use of the extremity?
    (Creighton University, 2024-04-23) Chun, Brandi; Hagen, Shannon; Ignacio, Rachel; Jividen, Sydney; Miller, Maddy
    In the United States, it is estimated that 40,000 adults are hospitalized for burns each year. With these burns, nearly 90% of burns sustained affect the upper extremity and/or the hand. Burn injuries require skilled intervention, which is completed by a variety of health professionals, but in order to preserve function and prevent further complications, occupational therapists use their unique skillset to fabricate splints to preserve functionality of the limb and to address specific concerns. Common concerns that may arise after burn injury include spasticity, joint contracture, skin integrity concerns, and pain. The aim of this critically appraised topic is to assess the effectiveness of fabricated orthoses for adults with third-degree burns on the upper extremity for maintaining functional use of the extremity. An analysis of six peer-reviewed articles published within the past ten years found that splinting after burn injury resulted in an increased passive and active range of motion, reduced risk for post-burn surgical intervention, and a reduced risk of deformity formation in the affected upper extremity. Further research into the effectiveness of splinting in specific regions of the upper extremity, like the wrist, elbow, or finger, is warranted.
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    Understanding Burnout and Turnover for Dual-Role Administrators: A Phenomenologic Study Understanding the Lived Experiences of Dual-Role School Superintendents and Principals
    (2024) Knight, Eric
    The paper is an exploration of dual-role school district leadership in a small rural state. Dual-role leaders are individuals who fulfill all the roles of both the school superintendent and principal. Smaller rural school districts are the districts that often utilize a dual-role superintendent and principal model. The position of principal and superintendent each have their unique and required job responsibilities, the combination of roles make these job requirements difficult to complete. When these job characteristics are not completed at a high level, there are negative effects on teacher turnover, student achievement, and leadership accountability begin to reveal themselves in the district. A qualitative methods approach was used to research the phenomenon of dual-role school administrator turnover and burnout. Interviews of current dual-role administrators and former dual-role administrators who are now working in singular superintendent roles were conducted. Keywords: qualitative, phenomenon, dual-role administrator, singular-role administrator, burnout, turnover
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    The effectiveness of constraint-induced movement therapy on improving independence for persons with stroke
    (Creighton University, 2025-05-17) Comerford, Christina; Nietzel, Allison; Otto, Lillian; Pearson, Hanna
    BACKGROUND: Stroke is defined as a blockage or disruption that occurs within the brain that typically causes damage to the brain, and often results in paralysis of one side of the body, difficulties with vision, balance, walking, and an overall decrease in independence and quality of life. Typically during rehabilitation, therapists utilize an intervention known as constraint-induced movement therapy (CIMT) which helps to increase range of motion (ROM), function of the upper extremity, and overall improvements in independence. AIM: This critically appraised topic (CAT) aims to determine the effectiveness of constraint-induced movement therapy in increasing independence in persons with stroke. METHODS: Level 1A systematic reviews of homogenous randomized control studies and meta-analysis studies were analyzed and included in the CAT if they involved CIMT interventions, the participants experienced a stroke, and the study was published in the last 10 years. RESULTS: Level 1A research completed on the use of CIMT has revealed strong, positive evidence regarding the effectiveness of CIMT on increasing independence in persons with stroke.
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    What is the effectiveness of mirror therapy on reducing pain level and improving occupational performance for patients with complex regional pain syndrome (CRPS)?
    (Creighton University, 2024-04-23) Guardi, Erin; Miller, Paityn; O'Brien, Marie; Opsahl, Mia; Rahill, Reilly
    CRPS is a debilitating condition characterized by intense and chronic pain, often affecting upper extremities. Traditional treatments, including medication, pose limitations such as side effects and high costs, prompting the exploration of non-pharmaceutical interventions like mirror therapy (MT). This critically appraised topic (CAT) synthesizes evidence from systematic reviews, randomized controlled trials, and cohort studies, demonstrating that MT can effectively decrease pain sensation, improve functional levels, and enhance body schema perception for CRPS patients. The therapy, involving the use of a mirror to reflect movements of the unaffected limb, increases neural activity and influences the motor network, aiding in pain reduction and restoration of function. Although promising, limitations such as small sample sizes, lack of differentiation between CRPS types, and potential biases warrant further research for refining protocols and optimizing outcomes. Despite these challenges, MT emerges as a cost-effective, accessible, and adjunctive therapy with the potential to enhance quality of life and reduce healthcare costs for individuals with CRPS.
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    Increasing Follow-Up for Patients with Elevated Blood Pressure in Rural Primary Care Clinic
    (Creighton University, 2024-04-22) Brouillette, Lynsey
    Purpose: The purpose of this quality improvement project was to encourage lifestyle modifications and increase follow-up for patients with elevated blood pressure and stage 1 hypertension. Background: Hypertension is a condition that can lead to organ damage and ultimately death if left undiagnosed and untreated. Modifiable risk factors for hypertension include eating a high sodium diet, smoking tobacco products, and living a sedentary lifestyle (Whelton et al., 2017). Current guidelines recommend close follow-up for patients with elevated blood pressure (Whelton et al., 2017). Sample/Setting: The target population includes two providers and ancillary staff at a small family medicine clinic in rural Iowa. Methods: During the rooming process of a scheduled office visit, patients with elevated blood pressure without a previous hypertension diagnosis were given a lifestyle questionnaire and written education regarding lifestyle modifications to improve blood pressure. Patents were then scheduled for a two week follow-up nurse visit. If blood pressure remained elevated at the nurse visit, patients were to be scheduled for a three month follow-up with their provider. Results: Fourteen patients were included in the project. All 14 patients (100%) were given patient education and completed the lifestyle questionnaire. Ten of the 14 patients (71.4%) completed a two week follow-up appointment either with a nurse or the provider. At the two week nurse visit follow-up appointment, five patients (35.7%) reported they attempted lifestyle modifications following the initial visit. Five patients (35.7%) were scheduled for follow-up visit with provider within one to three months. Three of the 14 patients (21%) were given a new diagnosis of hypertension and started on anti-hypertensive medication after their two week follow-up visit. Conclusion: Primary care providers can encourage patients with elevated blood pressure to make lifestyle changes and follow-up at short intervals to better treat elevated blood pressure.